May 12, 2020, PLLR News | The American Association For Justice

May 12, 2020, PLLR News

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Fraudulent concealment

photo of a cigarette with ash and smoke

A former smoker who developed laryngeal cancer sued Philip Morris USA, Inc., alleging the defendant used a public relations strategy designed to combat mounting scientific evidence of the dangers of smoking. The jury awarded the plaintiff $10.5 million. Principe v. Philip Morris USA, Inc.
 

Edward Principe began smoking cigarettes at age 15. He smoked Kool cigarettes and then switched to the Marlboro brand. For 29 years, he smoked approximately two-and-a-half packs per day. Although he was able to quit smoking, he was diagnosed as having laryngeal cancer, which necessitated removal of his voice box. Principe, 65, has incurred $360,000 in past medical expenses.

Principe sued Philip Morris USA, Inc., alleging fraudulent concealment and misrepresentation. Among other things, the plaintiff argued that the defendant used a public relations strategy designed to combat mounting scientific evidence of the dangers of smoking.

The jury awarded $10.5 million.

Citation: Principe v. Philip Morris USA, Inc., No. 17-25772-CA-25 (Fla. Cir. Ct. Miami-Dade Cty. Feb. 3, 2020).

Plaintiff counsel: AAJ member Alex Alvarez, Nick Reyes, Michael Alvarez, and AAJ member Philip Holden, all of Coral Gables, Fla.