December 21, 2017, Trial News

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AAJ releases 2017 corporate misconduct report

Kate Halloran

cover of AAJ report of Worst Corporate Conduct of 2017

As the year draws to a close, AAJ has released a new research report detailing the “Worst Corporate Conduct of 2017.” Covering an array of industries—financial, medical, transportation, and more—the report highlights how companies’ misconduct touches all aspects of American life and the potentially deadly consequences, as well as the essential role the civil justice system plays in protecting people from corporate wrongdoing.
 

As the year draws to a close, AAJ has released a new research report detailing the “Worst Corporate Conduct of 2017.” Covering an array of industries—financial, medical, transportation, and more—the report highlights how companies’ misconduct touches all aspects of American life and the potentially deadly consequences, as well as the essential role the civil justice system plays in protecting people from corporate wrongdoing.

Many of the examples discussed in the report made headlines this year, such as the violent treatment of a United Airlines passenger dragged off his flight to make room for another passenger, pervasive sexual harassment at Fox News, and Equifax’s massive data breach. Others involve years-long misconduct coming to light, including allegations that agrochemical company Monsanto ghostwrote scientific studies that concluded a chemical in its popular Roundup weedkiller did not cause cancer and Takata’s cover-up of a deadly defect affecting 70 million air bags. The companies featured in the report made billions in profits while putting consumers at risk.

As the report notes, U.S. Department of Justice white-collar prosecutions are at a 20-year low under the Trump administration and regulatory efforts to protect consumers have stalled. When these safeguards fail, the civil justice system is the last line of defense. The thousands of lawsuits against Johnson & Johnson for a variety of dangerous drugs and devices are just one example that demonstrates the need for access to the courts to hold corporations accountable. 

“The misconduct highlighted in this report is a stark reminder that corporations will stop at nothing to protect their profits—even if that means putting consumers and workers at risk,” said AAJ President Kathleen Nastri. “As this report clearly illustrates, Americans need access to the courts so they can get justice and stand up to the onslaught of misconduct.”

To read the full report, visit www.justice.org/2017misconductreport.